(Video) Iran: Ebrahim Raisi’s planned speech at the UN is a threat to human rights

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(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres stressed the persistent lack of accountability for the 1988 massacre.

September 16, 2021 - The memorial commemorates more than 30,000 political prisoners executed during the 1988 massacre.  Most of the political prisoners were members or supporters of the MEK.

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): The memorial commemorates more than 30,000 political prisoners who were executed during the 1988 massacre. Most of the political prisoners were members or supporters of the MEK.

September 16, 2021 - Ex-UN officials and human rights experts call for an investigation into the 1988 massacre.

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): Ex-UN officials, human rights experts demand investigation of the 1988 massacre.

Sep 16, 2021 - 30,000 political prisoners, mainly members and supporters of the MEK, were executed in 1988 on the direct orders of Khomeini, the founder of the Iranian regime.

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): 30,000 political prisoners, mainly MEK members and supporters, were executed in 1988 on the direct orders of Khomeini, the founder of the Iranian regime.

September 16, 2021 - The United Nations is urged to investigate the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran.

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): UN called on to investigate the 1988 massacre of political prisoners in Iran.

September 16, 2021 - World powers ashamed of their silence over the 1988 massacre

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): World powers ashamed of their silence over the 1988 massacre.

16.09.2021 - Regime in the 67th

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): Regime condemned in 67th.

Sep 16, 2021 - From social media widely used in campaigns following Raisi's appointment to the highest judicial office under the mullahs' rule.

(NCRI) and (PMOI / MEK Iran): From social media, widely used in campaigns following Raisi’s appointment as the highest judicial office under mullah rule.

By allowing him to speak, the international community is turning a blind eye to 3 decades of accumulated knowledge of the massacre and Raisi’s role in it

Geoffrey Robertson, a human rights lawyer from the UK, stated that nations that have ratified the Genocide Convention have an obligation to take action against those involved in such a crime. ”

– NCRI

PARIS, FRANCE, September 16, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ – Ever since the Supreme Leader of the Iranian regime elected Ebrahim Raisi as president, they have been demanding his prosecution and preventing him from making state visits. So far, however, these appeals have largely fallen on deaf ears.

Raisi is now due to attend the annual session of the United Nations General Assembly on the 21st regime.

That identity has been strengthened in recent weeks with the appointment and legislative endorsement of a number of senior officials whose terrorist honesty matches that of the President himself.

Raisi’s cabinet includes an unprecedented number of officers from the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, several people currently sanctioned by the United States and the European Union, and one on an Interpol warrant for his involvement in a 1994 Buenos Aires bombing who killed 85 people.

Raisi was also sanctioned by the USA in 2019. There is no warrant for his arrest in any country, but the reason for the sanctions against him could also be a reason for his arrest by authorities in practically any country in the world. This was stated last month by several human rights and international law scholars in a virtual conference organized by the National Council of Resistance of Iran (NCRI) to serve as a venue for discussion of the 1988 massacre of political prisoners.

The conference focused on the role Raisi played in these killings. For the families of the victims, for other officials of the Iranian regime and for the resistance movement working to overthrow the system that has supported the perpetrators of the massacre for more than three decades, Raisi’s indictment would be a strong sign that the impunity of the Regimes in such matters finally come to an end.

This impunity was compounded by weak and conciliatory policies towards the regime, particularly with regard to its human rights situation. Again, this was a focus of the recent NCRI conference, which included comments from a number of European lawmakers calling on their governments to take a more confident stance towards the Iranian regime and to consider measures that would actively support the Iranian people and their protests movements.

These protests began in earnest in late 2017 and culminated in a nationwide uprising in mid-January 2018 that spanned well over 100 cities – regime slogans and calls for regime change and “death to the dictator”.

The Iranian regime brutally suppressed these protests and Raisi played a key role in this repression as he was responsible for the regime’s judiciary at the time of the mass shootings, indiscriminate arrests and systematic torture.

Public condemnation of his role in this raid soon mixed with longstanding condemnation of his role as one of four officers serving on Tehran’s “Death Commission” in the summer of 1988 – trying to determine their political views and affiliations, and then summarily executed , they refused to bow to the theocratic system.

Over the course of about three months, this process killed over 30,000 people, including teenagers, pregnant women and many prisoners who had already served their original sentences before they were targeted by the fatwa of then Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini, which stated that any affiliation with the main opposition, the Mojahedin-e-Khalq, (PMOI / MEK) are considered “enmity against God” and are condemned to death.

This criminal charge is used to this day as a justification for the death penalty. Raisi’s promotion from chief of justice to chief of executive means that such politically motivated killings will be accelerated.

The total number of executions in Iran has risen in the more than two months Raisi served as chief justice, and it is rising even faster as his presidential administration takes shape. There is no doubt that this overall growth has been accompanied by an increase in the number of executions of political prisoners in particular.

Iran has always led the world on both measures, depending on its population, and its commitment to the abuses of the death penalty has certainly been enhanced by the inaction of foreign powers over human rights issues in Iran, particularly the 1988 massacre.

Last year, seven United Nations human rights experts released an open letter to the authorities of the Iranian regime complaining about the inaction and stating that the United Nations had an opportunity to hold the killings accountable that same year.

In December 1988, a resolution on Iran’s human rights record identified the rise in politically motivated executions but was not followed up by any UN body.

“The failure of these bodies,” the experts wrote, “has had a devastating effect on survivors and families as well as the general human rights situation in Iran.” In other words, inaction gave Tehran a sense of impunity at the time, and subsequent inaction has that impunity only reinforced.

Raisi’s presence at the UN General Assembly will be the greatest confirmation of this impunity to date. In letting him speak, the international community will turn a blind eye to three decades of accumulated knowledge of the massacre and Raisi’s role in it.

Geoffrey Robertson, a human rights lawyer from the United Kingdom, told the NCRI conference that nations that have ratified the Genocide Convention have an obligation to take action against those involved in such a crime.

They can do this, he explained, by using the principle of universal jurisdiction to arrest and prosecute Raisi or other known perpetrators if they enter the territory of a nation that is committed to the universal defense of human rights.

Shahin Gobadi
NCRI
+33 6 51 65 32 31
email us here

Who is Ebrahim Raisi, a candidate in Iran’s presidential election and an executioner in the 1988 massacre?


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